Sourdough Dinner Rolls

December 6, 2010

Sourdough Dinner Rolls

I mentioned the other day that I had made some sourdough dinner rolls for Thanksgiving and I was very pleased they turned out so well. I also mentioned when I made them again, I would post about it. I decided to make them on Saturday, because I had a leftover t-bone steak and wanted to make sandwiches with it. (It’s what you do when there is only one steak, but three people)
t-bone steak
This steak was from our trip to the Bechard Family Farm to pick up turkeys and other meat! So delicious!
Though I missed a step in the process and though my kitchen wasn’t quite as warm as it was on Thanksgiving (hence, the rise wasn’t as good), they were very tasty. As I usually do, I combined a couple of recipes into one. And though I like to give credit where credit is due, I failed to take note of the websites where I found them. (Keep in mind, I did this the night before Thanksgiving, so I’m sitting here copying off my hand-scribbled note) I do want to mention, my starter is normally the consistency of pancake batter.

Sourdough Dinner Rolls

2 cups of starter
1 Tbs honey
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 cup raw milk (soured is fine)
3 Tbs ghee
1 pastured egg, slightly beaten
3 cups flour

In mixer bowl or food processor bowl, mix starter with honey, salt, milk, and ghee.
sourdough ingredients
Add egg until just mixed, then slowly add flour. When dough forms, remove from bowl and knead for about 3 minutes by hand.
sourdough dough
Oil or grease a bowl at least twice as large as the dough, as well as one side of a piece of plastic wrap, large enough to cover the top of the bowl. Place the dough into the bowl, cover with plastic wrap (greased side down), and place in a warm location for two hours or until doubled in size. Unfortunately, this is the step I missed. (Don’t ask how!) At this point, my recipe/note says to punch the dough down, return to bowl and let rise till double again. I skipped this step both times, but was happy with the results, so ymmv1. Punch dough down and shape into rolls. I got 16 rolls out of this recipe. You can also take each roll, divide into 3 smaller rolls, then place each group of 3 into a greased muffin tin for a cloverleaf effect. I did a mix of both on Thanksgiving, but prefer the single roll.
ready to rise
Place on an oiled or greased baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap (again, greased side down) and let rise till double. I had to turn my oven on warm and place them on the back of my stove top, because my house generally stays cool this time of year. Once they have doubled in size, heat oven to 400o. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. I like to take a little ghee or grass-fed butter and rub over the tops of them when I take them out of the oven.
I think mine should have cooked a little longer. Also, they didn’t quite have the same “yeast roll” texture as the Thanksgiving ones. I’m not sure if that’s due to undercooking or failure to let them rise more than one time. And, as I mentioned earlier, I think they rose a little higher on Thanksgiving, because I had my oven on a higher temp while the turkey was cooking (so the kitchen was warmer). However, a little homemade mayo, sliced tomato2, sliced steak, slice of grass-fed cheese, and a little sea salt…mmm!!

making sandwich
I will definitely hang on to this recipe for those occasions when I’d like to serve a nice dinner roll.
Steak Sandwich on Sourdough

1 Your mileage may vary.
2 Though I support locally produced food, I always break down and buy California organic tomatoes from the health food store.

This post is part of Monday Mania real food blog carnival, hosted by Sarah @ The Healthy Home Economist.
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